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Silk Manufacturing and Its Problems James Chittick

Silk Manufacturing and Its Problems

James Chittick

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230453866
Paperback
194 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...elsewhere to meet theMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...elsewhere to meet the same conditions, and they suffer in many ways in consequence. The view of selling agents seems to be that no loss of any sort should fall on them, except bad debts that they have guaranteed against, and they will say that if they should be required to stand certain losses to which I will refer later (caused largely by their own action or inaction), that their commission should be higher. This by no means follows. They should protect not only themselves, but their manufacturers, against avoidable losses. How Mushroom Concerns are Encouraged to Start. Selling agents are generally seeking new business, and their department men are always eagerly searching for new accounts that they can attach to themselves. They, therefore, are led to encourage those who ought never to start in business, to start. Most mill employees think (as do most salesmen in the market, for that matter) that as long as wheels are turning in a mill lots of money is being made, and many of them are looking for a chance to start for themselves. A boss weaver and a warper foreman may each have saved some money, and between them may have, say, $5,000. They put their heads together and conclude to see what they can do. One of them knows some salesman, and they ask him what are the prospects at the selling end. He jumps at the chance of securing an account, and tells them that prospects are splendid- that he can put them on most profitable goods right off, and sell every yard they can make. Perhaps he introduces them to one of the heads of his house, and he, in turn, gives them a hot-air talk, deals in generalities, tells them that his firm will be glad to handle the account, will give them every facility for sale, and will make liberal...