Home » Martin And The Mountaintop An Illustrated Tribute To Martin Luther King, Jr by Richard D. Gordon
Martin And The Mountaintop An Illustrated Tribute To Martin Luther King, Jr Richard D. Gordon

Martin And The Mountaintop An Illustrated Tribute To Martin Luther King, Jr

Richard D. Gordon

Published
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
73 pages
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 About the Book 

.MARTIN AND THE MOUNTAINTOP, the poem, was written in response to feelings about the human qualities of Martin Luther King, Jr. I had wondered what emotions the “man” Martin must have gone through when people he loved died in the cause. We know heMore.MARTIN AND THE MOUNTAINTOP, the poem, was written in response to feelings about the human qualities of Martin Luther King, Jr. I had wondered what emotions the “man” Martin must have gone through when people he loved died in the cause. We know he valiantly struggled forward after every act of hate and violence- but I wondered if, in his quiet (or not so quiet) moments with God, sometimes asked if the struggle was worth the lives of loved ones… especially those of innocent children.In fact, this poem is dedicated to Cynthia Wesley, Addie Mae Collins, Carol Robertson, and Denise McNair- the four victims of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing on September15, 1963The book addresses the question: How did the “man” Martin, find a way to go deeper into the cause, and to continue the climb? His dream of Brotherhood, and his vision of the promised land, suggest a unique link with God. These are the elements tapped for the poem MARTIN AND THE MOUNTAINTOP.My love for James Weldon Johnson’s poetry, especially “The Creation” and “Let My People Go,” influenced the style of this effort. The rhythms and imagery of his style lends itself well to the relationship between Martin Luther King and his God.About the illustrations.My wife, Carol, when I asked her to illustrate the poem for me.. looked into my excited sketches and suggested that I do them myself. I protested, reminding her that… “I can’t draw…” She just smiled and said, “Give it a try.” These illustrations are the result of that trying. Thank you, Carol.