Home » How Much Earth: The Fresno Poets by Christopher Buckley
How Much Earth: The Fresno Poets Christopher Buckley

How Much Earth: The Fresno Poets

Christopher Buckley

Published January 1st 2001
ISBN : 9780966669176
Paperback
268 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

In 1958, Philip Levine arrived at what is now known as California State University, Fresno, fresh from his studies with Yvor Winters at Stanford, and set out to build a poetry curriculum. Soon, he invited other talented poets to join him. WhatMoreIn 1958, Philip Levine arrived at what is now known as California State University, Fresno, fresh from his studies with Yvor Winters at Stanford, and set out to build a poetry curriculum. Soon, he invited other talented poets to join him. What emerged over the next forty years became one of the most important regional American poetry movements of the second half of the twentieth century. Some of these writers were born or grew up in Fresno or the surrounding communities in the Central Valley. Some came to Fresno to study. Some were not students at all, but poets who were caught up in the excitement that spilled over to the community at large. Many have gone on to careers as poets, teachers, and editors influential in contemporary poetry. _How Much Earth_ is a definitive collection of the best of the Fresno School. Over fifty poets are represented, among them Levine, Larry Levis, Gary Soto, David St. John, Juan Felipe Herrera, Luis Omar Salinas, Peter Everwine, Lawson Fusao Inada, Dixie Salazar, and Corinne Hales. Author photos and statements on how Fresno influenced them are included. The introduction explores the impact of Levine’s influence on the American poetry scene far beyond the Central Valley, providing concise historical context.Characterized by an observant tone—clear-eyed, pragmatic—the poems here are informed by the scene and excitement generated by Levine, his colleagues and visiting poets, and the fields and orchards surrounding Fresno. _How Much Earth_ is a crucial record of this major American literary movement.